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ISRAEL, U.S. AND IRAN - HOPE FOR NO MILITARY SURPRISES

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The Montreal Review, July, 2010

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During his July (2010) visit in Israel the American president Barack Obama said that Israel and the United States have no interest to surprise each other in their politics to Iran. The president said for Israel's Channel 2 television that "It is unacceptable for Iran to possess nuclear weapons and we are going to do everything we can to prevent that happening," but noted that Israel would not "surprise" America with an attack on Iran's nuclear facilities.

Israel that is the only country in the Middle East with nuclear capabilities, but do not admit the possession of WMD, attacked in 2007 suspected nuclear facility in neighboring Syria and in 1981 bombed an Iraqi nuclear reactor.

 

Commenting Obama's words for Channel 2, Simon Tidal, an assistant editor of the Guardian and a foreign affairs columnist, said that the positions of Obama's administration towards Iran are still unclear, despite the notified American preference for a diplomatic solution. American position for military solution is vague, while the readiness of Israel to use, if necessary, a military force to stop Iranian nuclear program is known. America never explicitly said that it would support a possible Israeli attack against Iran. This creates an environment of growing ambiguity, thinks Tidal. "Nothing Obama said can remove the possibility that dangerous surprises may be in store, for both Israel and the US, emanating from Iran - Tidal said - The depth and breadth of the confrontation with Tehran on numerous fronts - political, commercial, geographical and physical - is growing exponentially. The situation grows less predictable, and thus more volatile, by the day. It would not take much to spark a full-blown crisis, most probably unplanned."

Despite the recent demonstration of friendship with Brazil, Turkey and Venezuela, Iran is still isolated on the international scene. Alaeddin Boroujerdi, the chairman of the Iranian parliament's foreign affairs committee, said that Russia, a participant in the international effort to contain Iran through economic sanctions, is "manipulated" by American and British intelligence services. Athough Moscow is Tehran's long-time nuclear collaborator, Boroujerdi's words show tensions between the two countries. Iran's Muslim neighbors are also anxious of a nuclear Persian power.

The expectations are Iran to be able to build nuclear weapons within two years. Some observers, such as the former Democrat senator Charles Robb, think that Iran will have the weapons until the end of this year. Israel thinks that if the problem were not resolved soon, the military action would be unavoidable.

 

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